When Parties and Politics Actually Mix

Normally, it’s bad form to discuss politics at a party.  Last time this happened, the topic of conservation nearly caused a brain hemorrhage in liberal woman who naively solicited my opinion.  At this current party, I again was in the minority – not necessarily because of my conservative leanings (although, that may have been true), but because I was the only person there to not speak Farsi.  Thankfully, everyone also knew English too.

I began speaking to one young man, Allie, who – at 22 – is a graduate student in the architecture program at Arizona State University.  He is a United States citizen, but he travels to Iran regularly.  He commented that one the largest differences he has noticed between the United States and Iran is the notion of “career” in the workplace.  Iran, like many other countries, employs a “siesta”-type work system whereby shops close mid-day to allow time for relaxation and eating.  Allie argued that this system provided the advantage of strengthening families by providing more “together time.”  In contrast, America works hard; it encourages its women to work hard; and  it purports to create a proportional relationship of work to “success” .  Unfortunately, according to him, America does this at the expense of family development.

Weakening the family unit, he posited, in turn will lead to a less stable society.  Eventually, this will undermine a nation’s strength.

Core governance begins at an individual level but it ends on a national level.  The more self-discipline one possesses individually, the less need one has for corporate government.  To maintain a strong national government, the lower spheres should be equally considered and strengthened.  Extrapolating Allie’s larger point, weakening the lower levels of government – namely the family – will slowly erode a nation’s strength.

The aim of ExDeserto, obviously, is to encourage reform that supports the pillars underpinning America’s national dominance.  ExDeserto accomplishes this goal by fostering discussion of these conservative ideas through this blog – and apparently by face-to-face communication at Persian parties too.

New York Marathon: An American Winner


Not since 1982 has an American won the New York City Marathon. This race is one of the most competitive in the world. Traditionally dominated by Africans, Americans have been left nipping at the heels – securing second was the American gold. But Meb Keflezighi changed that today, and I offer a hearty congratulations.

America represents freedom; it represents a chance to succeed. Call it exceptionalism or call it pride – but America strives to be the best. We aren’t satisfied with second.

Like many successful individuals, Meb did not not inherit wealth or fame. Born in Eritrea, he became an American citizen and now runs under the red, white, and blue. When I think about this race – particularly how difficult it is to win – I’m thankful this melting pot of American culture is able brings immigrants like Meb that continue to build on the greatness of prior generations. We aren’t satisfied with second. And we shouldn’t ever be.