A Perfect Anecdote in Support of Limited Government

Apparently, some “stimulus” money has gone to support the production of underground pornography. In the name of “art,” of course.

According to Foxnews.com, stimulus grants to San Francisco are funding “nude simulated-sex dances, Saturday night ‘pervert’ revues and the airing of pornographic horror films at art houses in San Francisco.”

Among the National Endowment for the Arts’ $80 million in stimulus disbursements are more than a few (beyond) questionable ones, including $50,000 for the Frameline film house, “which recently screened Thundercrack, ‘the world’s only underground kinky art porno horror film, complete with four men, three women and a gorilla,'” according to Fox.

Undoubtedly, there are more than a few other absurd awards in the NEA’s pot. Why? Well, the people in charge of these programs believe that “pervert revues” are worth your tax dollars, and Congress was too busy in February to read the stimulus bill or to place meaningful controls over its execution.

At the time, President Obama said, “We can’t afford to make perfect the enemy of the absolutely necessary.” Of course, many Americans may wonder why spending $80 million on a kinky art porno horror film is “absolutely necessary” to jump-starting the economy.

An employee of the San Francisco arts council told Fox that these expenditures, such as the thousands that went to the The Symmetry Project, a show featuring “the sharing of a central axis, spine, mouth, genitals, face, and anus reveal their interconnectedness and centrality in embodied experience,” will play a critical role in our economic recovery.

These absurdities might be funny, except that they’re true–and paid for with our tax dollars.

Because the Recovery Act spent most of your money in absurd ways such as this, Obama’s popularity is falling. Perhaps if he were actually committed to transperancy or job-creating stimulus, such as an across-the-board corporate tax cut, he wouldn’t have to look at the polls every night and wonder what he could have done differently.

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Feeding the White Elephant: Funding Embryonic Stem Cell Research

With the onset of the new president-elect Barack Obama accelerating toward the driver’s seat of democratically controlled Congress, conservatives cannot help but brace themselves for the sweeping reversal of many of Bush’s policies – particularly in regard to stem cell research. Parties on both sides of the aisle expect Obama to issue an executive order ending the government federal funding ban on embryonic stem cell (ESC) research.

With as much progress stem cell research has achieved, applying the brakes to this Bush policy will detrimentally alter forthcoming advancements. Moral issues aside, ESC research has been spinning in a rut since its inception. Fueling its “development” with federal funding will merely exacerbate the problem.

After nearly a decade, human ESC research is much like the wizard in Dorothy’s Oz: facially powerful, substantively empty. With the promise being a virtual panacea, consider the results: there have been zero treatments and zero clinical trials. Total cost: billions. The continuous mantra chanted by its advocates still sounds, “more time.” California committed $3 billion in tax-payer monies over 10 years with the goal of developing a single treatment. Connecticut and Maryland have invested millions as well. They still have virtually nothing to show.

Consider the alternative: adult stem cells have treated over 80 diseases with over 1,300 clinical trials. Advancements in cord blood banking, and induced pluripotent stem cells are leading the way in medical breakthroughs. Recently, European physicians completed the first successful transplant of a human windpipe using (you guessed it) adult stem cells. Plenty more could be said of treatments for leukemia, diabetes, sickle-cell anemia and heart disease.

The government should support what works; it makes common financial sense: invest in known, proven, un-problematic means to advance medicine for a guaranteed rate of return. But channeling that money into decade-long speculation without proven results serves to limit development in medical pioneering. It is essentially pork barrel spending.

ESC research is by no means limited as a “moral” issue. An executive order subsidizing this research merely feeds the white elephant.